BEGINNING XML BY DAVID HUNTER PDF

Toggle navigation. In fact, the introduction states that the book is "for people who know that it would be a pretty good idea to learn the language, but aren't percent sure why. The argument for the importance of XML is made quickly, and the basics of well-formed syntax are tackled right off. One notable distinction of this book is its excellent coverage of related technologies, such as cascading style sheets CSS and relational databases. Case studies on--among other things--how XML can be used to build discussion groups, and provide B2B data transfer, round out the text.

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You are currently using the site but have requested a page in the site. Would you like to change to the site? Product not available for purchase. So what is XML? It's a markup language, used to describe the structure of data in meaningful ways.

Perhaps the most well-known applications are web-related especially with the latest developments in handheld web access—for which some of the technology is XML-based. However, there are many other non-web-based applications for which XML is useful—for example, as a replacement for or to complement traditional databases, or for the transfer of financial information between businesses.

News organizations, along with individuals, have also been using XML to distribute syndicated news stories and blog entries. This book aims to teach you all you need to know about XML—what it is, how it works, what technologies surround it, and how it can best be used in a variety of situations, from simple data transfer to using XML in your web pages.

It answers the fundamental questions:. This book is for people who know that it would be a pretty good idea to learn XML but aren't percent sure why. You've heard the hype but haven't seen enough substance to figure out what XML is and what it can do. You may be using development tools that try to hide the XML behind user interfaces and scripts, but you want to know what is really happening behind the scenes.

You may already be somehow involved in web development and probably even know the basics of HTML, although neither of these qualifications is absolutely necessary for this book. What you don't need is knowledge of markup languages in general. This book assumes that you're new to the concept of markup languages, and we have structured it in a way that should make sense to the beginner and yet quickly bring you to XML expert status.

The word "Beginning" in the title refers to the style of the book, rather than the reader's experience level. There are two types of beginner for whom this book is ideal:. Programmers in this category will already understand some of the concepts discussed here, but you will learn how you can incorporate XML technologies to enhance those solutions you currently develop.

In addition to learning how XML technologies can be applied to such applications, you will be introduced to some new concepts to help you understand how such systems work. The subjects covered in this book are arranged to take you from novice to expert in as logical a manner as we could.

From there, you can quickly jump into specific areas of expertise, or, if you prefer, you can read through the book in order. Keep in mind that there is quite a lot of overlap in XML, and that some of the sections make use of techniques described elsewhere in the book. And you'll learn what "valid" really means.

You'll learn about technologies that use XML that enable you to send messages across the Internet, publish information, and discover services that provide information.

In addition, you'll learn how to design stunning graphics and make interactive forms using XML. Updates have been made to reflect the most recent versions of specifications and best practices throughout the book. In addition to the many changes, each chapter has a set of exercise questions to test your understanding of the material. Possible solutions to these questions appear in Appendix A. Part I: Introduction: The introduction is where most readers should begin. Once you have read this part you should be able to read and create your own XML documents.

You'll see that tags have no presentation meaning—they're just a way to describe the structure of the data. Chapter 3: XML Namespaces: Because tags can be made up, you need to avoid name conflicts when sharing documents. Namespaces provide a way to uniquely identify a group of tags, using a URI. This chapter explains how to use namespaces. It also shows you how to utilize these definitions to validate your XML documents. This chapter covers the basics of using DTDs.

In addition to defining document structure, they enable you to specify the individual datatypes of attribute values and element content. They are a more powerful alternative to DTDs. In addition to a new syntax and new features, it takes the best from XML Schemas and DTDs, and is therefore very simple and very powerful.

Part III: Processing: In addition to defining and creating XML documents, you need to know how to work with documents to extract information and convert it to other formats. In fact, easily extracting information and converting it to other formats is what makes XML so powerful.

This section describes strategies for storing and retrieving XML documents and document fragments from different databases. This chapter discusses these, and provides a general overview of how XML can be used in an n-tier architecture. In addition, new databases based on XML are introduced.

Part VI: Communication: Sending and receiving data from one computer to another is often difficult, but several technologies have been created to make communication with XML much easier. This edition includes a new chapter on Ajax techniques. This chapter not only discusses how to use the different versions of RSS and Atom, it also covers the future direction of the technology. In addition, it demonstrates how to create a simple newsreader application that works with any of the currently published versions.

Chapter Web Services: Web services enable you to perform cross-computer communications. Finally, it breaks down the assortment of specifications designed to work in conjunction with web services. Additionally, Ajax patterns can be used within web pages to communicate with the web server without refreshing. This chapter is new to the Fourth Edition. Some of these technologies are web-based, and some are designed for applications and mobile devices.

This part discusses the primary display strategies and formats used today. This chapter teaches you the basics of SVG and then dives into a more complex SVG-based application that can be published to the Internet.

This chapter demonstrates both the basics and some of the more interesting uses of XForms. The case study covers an example application and shows how the theory can be put into practice in real-life situations. The case study is new to this edition. An online version of this case study on the book's website covers the same material using Ruby on Rails instead of.

Appendixes: Appendix A provides answers to the exercise questions that appear throughout the book. The remaining appendixes provide reference material that you may find useful as you begin to apply the knowledge gained throughout the book in your own applications.

View Instructor Companion Site. Jeff Rafter is an independent consultant based in Redlands, California. His focus is one emerging technology and web standards, including XML and validation. In he was awarded the title of Microsoft Most Valuable Professional in XML for community contributions and technical expertise; he has subsequently been re-awarded every year since.

Eric van der Vlist is an independent consultant and trainer. His domains of expertise include web development and XML technologies. He is the creator and main editor of XMLfr. Danny Ayers is a freelance developer and consultant specializing in cutting-edge web technologies. Linda McKinnon has more than 10 years of experience as a successful trainer and network engineer, assisting both private and public enterprises in network architecture design, implementation, system administration, and RP procurement.

She is a renowned mentor and has published numerous Linux study guide for Wiley Press and Gearhead Press. Request permission to reuse content from this site.

Undetected location. NO YES. Beginning XML, 4th Edition. Selected type: Paperback. This is a dummy description. When the first edition of this book was written, XML was a relatively new language but already gaining ground fast and becoming more and more widely used in a vast range of applications.

By the time of the second edition, XML had already proven itself to be more than a passing fad, and was in fact being used throughout the industry for an incredibly wide range of uses. With the third edition, it was clear that XML was a mature technology, but more important, it became evident that the XML landscape was dividing into several areas of expertise.

Now in this edition, we needed to categorize the increasing number of specifications surrounding XML, which either use XML or provide functionality in addition to the XML core specification.

Instructor View Instructor Companion Site. Providing technical leadership and guidance for solving his clients' business problems, he is a jack-of-all-trades and master of some. With a career that has included design, development, support, training, writing, and other roles, he has had extensive experience building scalable, reliable, enterprise-class applications.

David loves to peek under the hood at any new technology that comes his way, and when one catches his fancy, he really gets his hands dirty. He loves nothing more than sharing these technologies with others. Permissions Request permission to reuse content from this site. Table of contents Acknowledgments. Part I: Introduction. Chapter 3: XML Namespaces.

Part II: Validation. Chapter 4: Document Type Definitions. Chapter 5: XML Schemas. Part III: Processing. Chapter 7: XPath. Chapter 8: XSLT. Part IV: Databases. Chapter XML and Databases.

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Beginning XML, 4th Edition

Andrew Watt is an independent consultant and computer book author with an interest and expertise in various XML technologies. Currently, he is focusing on the use of XML in Microsoft technologies. For the past eight years his focus has shifted to web development and markup languages, and he is always eager to explore emerging technologies. Jeff currently resides in Redlands, California, where he enjoys restoring his turn-of-the-century house, playing frisbee with his Border Collie and writing sonnets.

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Beginning XML

So what is XML? It's a markup language, used to describe the structure of data in meaningful ways. Perhaps the most well-known applications are web-related especially with the latest developments in handheld web access—for which some of the technology is XML-based. However, there are many other non-web-based applications for which XML is useful—for example, as a replacement for or to complement traditional databases, or for the transfer of financial information between businesses.

ENDODONTIC THERAPY FRANKLIN S WEINE PDF

You are currently using the site but have requested a page in the site. Would you like to change to the site? Product not available for purchase. So what is XML? It's a markup language, used to describe the structure of data in meaningful ways.

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