IBERVILLEA LINDHEIMERI PDF

Beautiful vine fruiting in the woods along the SW Austin roadside in late July The fruit is deep persimmon colored and thick on the vine. Very striking--I turned around and came back to look at it. I will harvest a fruit and see if I can grow it. I discovered the bright red fruits late in The vine did not re-appear in but this spring I could identify the leaves as described and shown in photos by the posters.

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Beautiful vine fruiting in the woods along the SW Austin roadside in late July The fruit is deep persimmon colored and thick on the vine.

Very striking--I turned around and came back to look at it. I will harvest a fruit and see if I can grow it. I discovered the bright red fruits late in The vine did not re-appear in but this spring I could identify the leaves as described and shown in photos by the posters.

I look forward to studying the flowers and fruits. The vine is growing along a fence line and the location is about 35 miles west of Fort Worth. The soil is quite poor with limestone beds under about 2 inches of top soil. I also will harvest the seeds and see if I can put them in the ground as per reommendations. I have not grown this plant, but have observed it in its native habitat in Zone 8a and 8b.

Ibervillea lindheimerii Also have found it spelled Ibervillea lindheimeri is also commonly known as balsam gourd, balsamapple, snake-apple and Rio Grande globeberry and is related to the cucumber.

It is a perennial, deciduous vine that is native to Oklahoma, Texas and New Mexico. In Texas it is uncommon and usually found in South Central Texas most frequently in the Edwards Plateau region and northward to southern Oklahoma and westward into New Mexico.

It thrives on rocky hills and draws, fencerows, dry woods or thickets, brushland and occasionally in open, rocky soil. Not too picky about what type of soil in which it will grow, it can be found growing in sandy, sandy loam, mediu It is a slow growing vine, but eventually produces stems up to usually 7 feet long can grow larger with more frequent water.

Due to its thick tubered root, the plant is able to withstand extended drought and browsing of its foliage. Being shade tolerant, it is a great plant for gardens with little sun; however, balsam gourd will set more fruit in the sun. The leaves can be up to approximately 4. The young balsam gourd leaves are ivy-like with practically straight edges and they resemble several other vines.

The leaves become more deeply notched and more "fleshy" as the plant matures and are quite lovely. The upper surface is glabrous with the undersides and sometimes margins scattered with pale callosities thick and hardened outgrowths or very short scabrous hairs. The plant produces long tendrils and it is frequently found intertwined in the foliage of shrubs and small trees. When they freeze back in the winter, they are slow to resprout; they reppear when the temperatures are consistently very warm.

From April through July, balsam gourd produces 5 to 8 staminate blooms per raceme. The 1 to 2 inches in diameter, smooth, unedible fruit start appearing in August through October; look like small round, striped watermelons when young and turn an orangish-red to bright red when mature.

The ripe fruit have soft fleshy skin. It has a slightly sweet smell, the 6 mm long seeds are covered in a fleshy gel. The seeds are eaten by scaled quail, and the leaves are occasionally eaten by white tailed deer. This vine puts on quite a show when the fruit turn red. They are highly conspicuous and look like red Christmas ornaments.

It would make a great vine in a shady area of a rock garden, xeriscape or perennial bed growing on a support of some kind, up a tree or along a fence. Native from Texas to southern California, this perennial deciduous vine has a large underground tuber with vining stems. The leaves are three-lobed with scalloped edges. The flower resembles a small zucchini-like squash blossom with a small attached fruit.

This globular fruit when mature is 1" in diameter, and turns bright red in late summer. The large root looks like a flattened turnip and may grow to one foot across. Found under trees and shrubs, which act as nurse plants for the seedlings. The vine stem grows 6 to 12 feet meters and is deciduous. Well-drained soil is required and avoid excess water, especially when dormant. Rots easily. Nurse plants are necessary for humidity and shade requirements for the seedlings, as well as providing support for the vines.

Javelinas relish the roots and fruit. Gardeners' Notes: 2. Post a comment about this plant. Popular Plants. Use of this Web site constitutes acceptance of the Davesgarden. Cucurbitaceae koo-ker-bih-TAY-see-ee Info. Ibervillea ee-ber-VEE-lee-uh Info. On Aug 11, , lantana from Zone 7a wrote: Native from Texas to southern California, this perennial deciduous vine has a large underground tuber with vining stems.

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Ibervillea Species, Balsam-Apple, Balsam Gourd, Globe Berry, Lindheimer's Globeberry, Snake Apple

Habitat: Common on Chihuahuan desert on heavier sands, clay, or caliche, in flat brushy pastures, edges of thickets, open woods, rocky slopes and along canyon walls. It grows on, using its tendrils to climb over rocks and various woody shrubs and fences, especially allthorn Koeberlinia spinosa. Description: Ibervillea tenuisecta is an herbaceous perennial climbing vine with a large caudex, it produces yellow flowers in summer and little bright miniature red-orange melons in autumn. The fruits are more noticeable than the flowers. It is similar and strictly related to Ibervillea lindheimeri. Habit: Geophyte twining vine, the vine part is mostly annual and deciduous.

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Habitat and ecology: Fairly frequent on sandy soils, mostly in coastal oak woods, but also on a variety of soil types in rocky hills and fences, at edges of thickets and in open woods. The seeds are eaten by scaled quail, and the leaves are occasionally eaten by white-tailed deer. Description: Ibervillea lindheimeri is a slender perennial, trailing or climbing vine with tendrils, growing from a large caudex, it produces small hardly noticeable, yellow flowers in summer and showy, bright orange-to-red melons The fruits are more noticeable than the flowers and visible at eye level, or higher, in the trees. The dark green, lobed leaves are scattered along the branching stems, giving the vine a delicate appearance. You don't have to worry about it getting out of hand, because it dies to the ground in the winter. Ibervilleas are often grown in containers with the caudex exposed.

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