ICAO DOC 9432 MANUAL OF RADIOTELEPHONY PDF

If you wish to contribute or participate in the discussions about articles you are invited to join SKYbrary as a registered user. Of the many factors involved in the process of communication, phraseology is perhaps the most important, because it enables us to communicate quickly and effectively despite differences in language and reduces the opportunity for misunderstanding. Ambiguous or non-standard phraseology is a frequent causal or contributory factor in aircraft accidents and incidents. Many national authorities also publish radiotelephony manuals which amplify ICAO provisions, and in some cases modify them to suit local conditions.

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Doc Manual of Radiotelephony. Approved by the Secretary General and published under his authority. Third Edition — International Civil Aviation Organization.

The space below is provided to keep a record of such amendments. The purpose of this manual is to provide examples of the radiotelep hony phraseology found in those two docu ments. While the procedures and phraseology specifically reflect the si tuation in an environment where very high frequency VHF is in use, they are equally applicable in those areas where high frequency HF is used.

ICAO phraseologies are developed to provide efficient, clear, concise, and unambiguous communications, and constant attention should be given to the correct use of ICAO phraseologies in all instances in which they are applicable. However, it is not possible to provide phraseologies to cover every conceivable situation which may arise, and the examples contained in this manual are not exhaustive, but merely representative of radiotelephony phraseology in common use. When it is necessary to use plain language, it should be used according to the same principles that govern the development of phras eologies in that communications should be clear, concise, and unambiguous.

Sufficient proficiency in the language being used is also required. In addition to correct use of phraseologies and adequate language proficiency, it is also important to keep in mind that the language being used in radiotel ephony is often not the first language of the receiver or originator of a transmission.

An awareness of the special difficulties faced by second-language speakers contributes to safer communications. Transmissions should be slow and cl ear. Direct statements which avoid idiomatic expressions are easier to understand than indire ct statements or colloquialisms or slang.

Furthermore, certain States may specify in their aeronautical information publication AIP particular requirements on first contact when entering their airspace or prior to leaving their airspace.

Pilots should, therefore, ensure that they are aware of such procedures by referring to the relevant instructions e.

Exam ples of phraseology of this type are beyond the scope of this manual. Table of Contents. Aircraft comm unications failure. Chapter 1. Aerodrome control service. Air traffic control service for aerodrome traffic. Aerodrome traffic. All traffic on the manoeuvring area of an aerodrome and all aircraft flying in the vicinity of an aerodrome. Aerodrome traffic circuit. The specified path to be flown by aircraft operating in the vicinity of an aerodrome.

Aeronautical mobile service RR S1. A mobile service between aeronautic al stations and aircraft stations, or between aircraft stations, in which survival craft stations may partici pate; emergency position-indicating radiobeacon stations may also participate in this service on designated distress and emergency frequencies.

Aeronautical station RR S1. A land station in the aeronautical mob ile service. In certain instances, an aeronautical station may be located, for exampl e, on board ship or on a platform at sea. Air-ground communication. Two-way communication between aircraft and stations or locations on the surface of the earth. Air traffic. All aircraft in flight or operating on the manoeuvring area of an aerodrome. Air traffic control clearance. Authorization for an aircraft to proceed u nder conditions specified by an air traffic control unit.

Note 1. Note 2. Air traffic service ATS. A generic term meaning variously, flight info rmation service, alerting service, air traffic advisory service, air traffic control service area cont rol service, approach control service or aerodrome control service.

Air traffic services unit. A generic term meaning variously, air traffic control unit, flight information centre or air traffic services reporting office. A control area or portion thereof established in the form of a corridor. The vertical distance of a level, a point or an object considered as a point, measured from mean sea level MSL.

Approach control service. Air traffic control service for arri ving or departing controlled flights. A defined area, on a land aerodrome, intended to accommodate aircraft for purposes of loading or unloading passengers, mail or cargo, fuelling, parking or maintenance.

Area control centre ACC. A unit established to provide air traffic cont rol service to controlled flights in control areas under its jurisdiction.

Automatic terminal info rmation service ATIS. The automatic provision of current, routine information to arriving and departing aircraft throughout 24 hours or a specified portion thereof:. The provision of ATIS via data link. The provision of ATIS by means of continuous and repetitive voice broadcasts. Blind transmission. A transmission from one station to another station in circumstances where two-way communication cannot be established but where it is be lieved that the called stati on is able to receive the transmission.

A transmission of information relating to air navi gation that is not addressed to a specific station or stations. Clearance limit. The point to which an aircraft is granted an air traffic control clearance. Controlled airspace. An airspace of defined dimensions within which air traffic control service is provided in accordance with the airspace classification. Control zone.

A controlled airspace extending upwards from the surface of the earth to a specified upper limit. Expected approach time.

The time at which ATC expects that an ar riving aircraft, following a delay, will leave the holding fix to complete its approach for a landing. Flight information centre. A unit established to provide flight in formation service and alerting service. Flight plan. Specified information provided to air traffic services units, relative to an intended flight or portion of a flight of an aircraft.

The direction in which the longitudinal axis of an aircraft is pointed, usually expressed in degrees from North true, magnet ic, compass or grid.

Holding fix. A geographical location that serves as a reference for a holding procedure. Holding procedure. A predetermined manoeuvre which keeps an aircraft within a specified airspace while awaiting further clearance. IFR flight. A flight conducted in accordance with the instrument flight rules.

Instrument meteorological conditions IMC. Meteorological conditions expres sed in terms of visibility, distance from cloud, and ceiling, less than the mini ma specified for visual meteorological conditions.

A generic term relating to the vertical position of an aircraft in flight and meaning variously, height, altitude or flight level. Manoeuvring area. That part of an aerodrome to be used for th e take-off, landing and taxiing of aircraft, excluding aprons.

Missed approach procedure. The procedure to be followed if the approach cannot be continued. Movement area. That part of an aerodrome to be used for th e take-off, landing and taxiing of aircraft, consisting of the manoeuvring area and the apron s. Radar approach. An approach in which the final approach phase is executed under the direction of a radar controller. Radar identification. The situation which exists when the radar position of a particular aircraft is seen on a radar display and positively identifi ed by the air traffic controller.

Radar vectoring. Provision of navigational guidance to aircraft in the form of specific headings, based on the use of radar. Reporting point. A specified geographical location in relation to which the position of an aircraft can be reported. Runway visual range RVR. The range over which the pilot of an ai rcraft on the centre line of a runway can see the runway surface markings or the lights delin eating the runway or identifying its centre line.

The point where the nominal glide path intercepts the runway. VFR flight.

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Doc Manual of Radiotelephony. Approved by the Secretary General and published under his authority. Third Edition — International Civil Aviation Organization.

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Doc 9432 Manual of Radiotelephony.pdf

If you wish to contribute or participate in the discussions about articles you are invited to join SKYbrary as a registered user. Of the many factors involved in the process of communication, phraseology is perhaps the most important because it enables us to communicate quickly and effectively despite differences in language and reduces the opportunity for misunderstanding. Ambiguous or non-standard phraseology is a frequent causal or contributory factor in aircraft accidents and incidents. Many national authorities also publish radiotelephony manuals which amplify ICAO provisions, and in some cases modify them to suit local conditions. This article deals with non-standard phraseology, which is sometimes adopted unilaterally by national or local air traffic services in an attempt to alleviate problems; however, standard phraseology minimises the potential for misunderstanding.

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