LINDA HUTCHEON A THEORY OF PARODY PDF

Parody is repetition with critical distance, and must be distinguished from satire parody relies on reference to an earlier text or text, and satire relies on reference to reality and from irony an Linda Hutcheon. In this major study of a flexible and multifaceted mode of expression, Linda Hutcheon looks at works of modern literature, visual art, music, film, theater, and architecture to arrive at a comprehensive assessment of what parody is and what it does. Hutcheon identifies parody as one of the major forms of modern self-reflexivity, one that marks the intersection of invention and critique and offers an important mode of coming to terms with the texts and discourses of the past. She shows how parody, through ironic playing with multiple conventions, combines creative expression with critical commentary. Its productive-creative approach to tradition results in a modern recoding that establishes difference at the heart of similarity.

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Access options available:. More successfully than previous commentators, Gardner discerns the connections between the novels and other works of the s, giving full due to The Mulberry Bush, Wilson's only stage play. But the summaries of the longer works - and with some justice Gardner adjudges them as too long - crowdoutcriticalcommentary, leavingroom onlyforbrieflyargued evaluation.

Thus, for example, the sheer bulk of the plots of No Laughing Matter and As If By Magic disallows sustained analytical consideration, suggesting that a writer of Wilson's depth and amplitude is particularly ill served by Twayne's format. As it is, Wilson the writer of fiction is the exclusive concern here, with the three critical biographies of Zola, Dickens, and Kipling receiving only passing mention and the vast output of essays and reviews almost unnoticed.

The volume includes a brief chronology to and a primary and secondary selected bibliography. The latter fails to include Robert J. Stanton's A Bibliography ofModern British Novelists , to date the most comprehensive, if far from complete, listing of Wilson's works and criticism on him, supplemented by J.

Stape's similarly unmentioned checklist for in the TeL special issue. This is an urbanely written overview that will particularly interest the advanced undergraduate to whom it is addressed. The scholar, with whom this series is admittedly little concerned, must look elsewhere for the critical insights and information that will assist him in his reading of Wilson and must still await a study that will seriously address itself to the work of one of England's most significant post-war writers.

Leavis might have agreed, since he saw parody as the enemy of genius and orginality. But this view of parody, as a parasitic and reactionary mode, leaves little room for some of the great parodic works in literature and art: Don Quixote, Tristram Shandy, Ulysses, Travesties, the paintings of Magritte, and Post-Modern architecture. What do we do with the late Picasso and his series of paintings and sculptures modelled on Manet's Dejeuner sur [,herbe?

What do we do with the Troubadours' practice of pairing and complementing each of their songs with its own parody? As Linda Hutcheon points out in A Theory of Parody, the etymology of the words, para odos, allows for not justa song sung against the original, but one sung beside the other.

Her definition of parody is more neutral and expansive: 'parody is Her definition allows, as does that of the Russian Formalists, for continuity as well as change, for both conservative parodies and for those 'capable of transformative power in creating new syntheses.

Textual repetition, as Hutcheon points out, raises particularly modern critical issues: the status of the subject, the reference of the text, and even the closure of texts. Hutcheon's book is not a history of parody, nor a systematic analysis of the techniques of parody. It sets out rather to define the nature and pragmatic functions of parody, deciding among other things what exactly can be parodied any codified form , and whether parody is a genre or a technique a genre, with its own structural identity and hermeneutic function.

Her definition of parody, she insists, is not transhistorical, but, in offering some elements that Project MUSE promotes the creation and dissemination of essential humanities and social science resources through collaboration with libraries, publishers, and scholars worldwide.

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Linda Hutcheon

Access options available:. More successfully than previous commentators, Gardner discerns the connections between the novels and other works of the s, giving full due to The Mulberry Bush, Wilson's only stage play. But the summaries of the longer works - and with some justice Gardner adjudges them as too long - crowdoutcriticalcommentary, leavingroom onlyforbrieflyargued evaluation. Thus, for example, the sheer bulk of the plots of No Laughing Matter and As If By Magic disallows sustained analytical consideration, suggesting that a writer of Wilson's depth and amplitude is particularly ill served by Twayne's format. As it is, Wilson the writer of fiction is the exclusive concern here, with the three critical biographies of Zola, Dickens, and Kipling receiving only passing mention and the vast output of essays and reviews almost unnoticed. The volume includes a brief chronology to and a primary and secondary selected bibliography. The latter fails to include Robert J.

HISTORIA DE LA ETNOLOGIA ANGEL PALERM PDF

More successfully than previous commentators, Gardner discerns the connections between the novels and other works of the s, giving full due to The Mulberry Bush, Wilson's only stage play. But the summaries of the longer works - and with some justice Gardner adjudges them as too long - crowdoutcriticalcommentary, leavingroom onlyforbrieflyargued evaluation. Thus, for example, the sheer bulk of the plots of No Laughing Matter and As If By Magic disallows sustained analytical consideration, suggesting that a writer of Wilson's depth and amplitude is particularly ill served by Twayne's format. As it is, Wilson the writer of fiction is the exclusive concern here, with the three critical biographies of Zola, Dickens, and Kipling receiving only passing mention and the vast output of essays and reviews almost unnoticed.

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In she was elected the th President of the Modern Language Association , the third Canadian to hold this position, and the first Canadian woman. She is particularly known for her influential theories of postmodernism. Hutcheon's publications reflect an interest in aesthetic micro-practices such as irony in Irony's Edge Routledge, , parody in A Theory of Parody Meuthen, , and adaptation in A Theory of Adaptation Routledge, Hutcheon has also authored texts which synthesize and contextualize these practices with regard to broader debates about postmodernism, such as The Politics of Postmodernism Routledge, , A Poetics of Postmodernism Routledge, , and Rethinking Literary History OUP, Hutcheon's version of postmodernism is often contrasted with that of Fredric Jameson in North America: while the latter laments the lack of critical capacities to which postmodern subjects have access, and analyses present capitalist cultural production in terms of a dehistoricized spatial pastiche, Hutcheon highlights the ways in which postmodern modalities actually aid in the process of critique. Specifically, Hutcheon suggests that postmodernism works through parody to "both legitimize and subvert that which it parodies" Politics, Thus, far from dehistoricizing the present or organizing history into an incoherent and detached pastiche, postmodernism can rethink history and offer new critical capacities.

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